Ibanez

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Review: Ibanez SR300E

First Impressions

Well, I'd say this one is a bit of a looker. The pictures I took didn't really do it much justice, to be fair, so I borrowed (stole) one from Ibanez. This model has been around for a little while but I'd not really clocked it - shame on me. 

The Ibanez SR300E in Jet Stream Green. Mmmm... Jet Stream Green.... (Picture Credit: www.ibanez.com)

The Ibanez SR300E in Jet Stream Green. Mmmm... Jet Stream Green.... (Picture Credit: www.ibanez.com)

The bass itself has a solid mahogany body that has been shaped and scalloped to cut down the weight - you definitely won't end up looking like Quasimodo after a two-hour gig with this one! The neck is 5 piece maple and walnut. I am a sucker for features like this but the twin skunk stripes down the back of the satin-finished neck are gorgeous. The finger-board is Jotoba, a similar wood to rosewood (but not on the CITES list). I was also struck by how fast the neck felt. It is a tiny 38mm at the nut and only 19.5mm thickness at the first fret (stats from the good people at Ibanez). 

Hardware - Any Good?

Actually, yes, it is. One of my biggest irritations with lower / mid range basses is a cheap bridge. Some of them look like bits of bent metal: this is pretty far from the truth with the SR300E. Ibanez have fitted a hi-mass, railed bridge called the Accu-Cast B120. Firstly, the string spacing is bang-on and, secondly, the heavyweight bridge creates great tone and sustain. 

The pick-ups are active with a terrific 3-band EQ which you can easily tweak to get a huge range of tones, from a scooped funk to burpy jazz or low-end thump. However, it is the active power-tap circuit that sets this apart. You can switch from single coil to humbucker to a power-tap mode that utilises both settings. I like the single-coil's clarity but I had a lot of fun using the humbuckers. The pick-ups also have a sweep pot that allows you to combine the attack from the bridge with the warmer tones from the the neck. 

How Does It Play?

The example I played was set-up with a very low action. I quite like that but other players might want to tweak it up a bit, especially if you're using a plectrum. The simple controls made it easy to create a range of sounds without stressing yourself out! I tried it through my Marshall MB4410 on both the digital and classic (valve pre-amp) channels using my standard amp EQ and compression and was very impressed. The bite and snap from paying slap riffs (I tend to vamp on 'Sgt Baker' by Primus*) is very good indeed and I like the tone from playing plucked funk riffs that include ghost notes. Boosting the middle and plucking close to the bridge is also instantly rewarding and you can get it to 'burp' easily as the pick-ups are so responsive. Going for a warmer sound, boosting the bass and playing low-down fretted runs on the humbucker setting was great too: a touch of overdrive and you can go all Jack Bruce if you want.

Summary

Honestly, this is a ridiculously good bass for under £250. It has a fast neck with a narrow profile, low-action and terrific range of sounds from the on-board 3-band EQ and 3-way power tap switch. It is light and easy to play, which is a great option for new bassists or guitarists finally turning to the Dark-Side.

 

* If you like bass, check out Primus. Les Claypool is a genius.